About Fetal Akinesia Deformation Sequence

Fetal Akinesia Deformation Sequence 1, also known as fetal akinesia deformation sequence, is related to polyhydramnios and multiple pterygium syndrome, escobar variant. An important gene associated with Fetal Akinesia Deformation Sequence 1 is MUSK (Muscle Associated Receptor Tyrosine Kinase), and among its related pathways/superpathways are Agrin Interactions at Neuromuscular Junction and "Succinylcholine Pathway, Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics". The drugs Borage oil and Soy Bean have been mentioned in the context of this disorder. Affiliated tissues include lung, placenta and bone, and related phenotypes are respiratory insufficiency and intrauterine growth retardation

Major Symptoms of Fetal Akinesia Deformation Sequence

Fetal akinesia deformation sequence is a term that describes the movement and development of the fetus in the womb. The main symptoms include:

1. Late deceleration: after 37 weeks of pregnancy, the fetus has a temporary decrease in speed, but the fetal heart rate remains unchanged during uterine contractions.

2. Shortening of the active phase: After 38 weeks of pregnancy, the active phase of uterine contractions is significantly shortened.

3. Slow dilation of the cervix: After 39 weeks of pregnancy, the cervix expands slowly, no more than 1 cm per minute.

4. The presenting part of the fetus enters the pelvis: After 39 weeks of pregnancy, when the presenting part of the fetus (i. e. the fetal head) enters the pelvis, there may be a deceleration lasting 30 seconds to 1 minute.

5. The fetal heart rate baseline variation disappears: After 39 weeks of pregnancy, the fetal heart rate baseline variation appears, but when the deceleration lasts for a long time (>30 seconds), the variation disappears.

6. Variable deceleration: After 39 weeks of pregnancy, the intensity of uterine contractions changes, and variable deceleration occurs (that is, the fetal heart rate baseline fluctuates during deceleration, but the variable deceleration time is longer, lasting between 30 seconds and 1 minute).

7. Late deceleration: After 39 weeks of pregnancy, the fetal speed temporarily decreases, but the fetal heart rate remains unchanged during uterine contractions. These symptoms mainly manifest as the gradual weakening of fetal movement and development until it completely stops.

Suitable Lifestyle for People with Fetal Akinesia Deformation Sequence

Fetal akinesia deformation sequence is a genetic disorder that often affects the motor development of infants and young children. Because the disease is caused by a genetic mutation, there are no specific lifestyle changes that can help prevent or treat it. However, we can offer some suggestions to help patients improve their quality of life.

1. Early intervention: Early diagnosis and treatment can improve patients’ motor development and quality of life. Physical therapy is recommended for patients in early childhood to help build muscle strength and coordination.

2. Nutritional support: Patients may require special diets to meet their nutritional needs. Patients are advised to follow their doctor's advice and maintain a proper nutritional balance.

3. Exercise therapy: Appropriate exercise can improve the patient's muscle strength and coordination and help improve movement ability. It is recommended that patients perform exercise therapy under the guidance of a doctor to avoid sports injuries.

4. Psychological support: Patients may need psychotherapy to cope with the anxiety and depression caused by the disease. Patients are advised to work with a psychologist or therapist to receive appropriate support and guidance.

5. Social activities: Patients can participate in social activities to enhance social support. Patients are advised to connect with family, friends, or community organizations to share experiences and emotions. In short, for people suffering from Fetal Akinesia deformation sequence, it is important to take appropriate measures to improve life and exercise ability under the guidance of a doctor.

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