About Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous

Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous, also known as non-syndromic congenital retinal non-attachment, is related to persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, autosomal recessive and amblyopia. An important gene associated with Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous is NDP (Norrin Cystine Knot Growth Factor NDP), and among its related pathways/superpathways are Malignant pleural mesothelioma and Breast cancer pathway. Affiliated tissues include eye, retina and brain, and related phenotypes are corneal opacity and microphthalmia

Major Symptoms of Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous

Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) is a rare eye disease. Its main symptoms include:

1. Symptoms such as redness, pain, and foreign body sensation in front of the eyes, often accompanied by headaches and dizziness.

2. Vision gradually decreases. In the early stage, you may only see blurry or deformed vision, but in the later stage, it may be difficult to see objects clearly.

3. Symptoms such as flashes in front of the eyes, flashing bands, dark spots, and floaters appear.

4. Some patients may have symptoms such as visual field defects, diplopia, and strabismus.

5. Symptoms such as exophthalmos, eyelid ptosis, and diplopia may occur in the late stage.

6. Some patients may have symptoms such as papilledema and fundus hemorrhage.

7. Symptoms such as retinal detachment and blindness may occur in the late stage. PHPV is a complex disease, and symptoms vary depending on individual differences, disease severity and other factors.

Suitable Lifestyle for People with Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous

Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) is a rare eye condition that is characterized by the continuous growth of new vitreous tissue in the eye. People with PHPV may experience a range of symptoms, including persistent vision changes, light sensitivity, and cataracts. In terms of lifestyle, it is important for individuals with PHPV to prioritize their eye health and seek professional medical advice. They should avoid activities that can cause injury to their eyes, such as high impact sports or activities that involve prolonged staring. They should also avoid using certain medications that can cause harm to the retina, such as certain pain medications. It is also important for individuals with PHPV to maintain a healthy eye diet and avoid exposure to harmful environmental factors, such as UV rays. They should also follow a consistent eye care, including regular eye exams and routine cleaning and moisturizing their eyes. Overall, individuals with PHPV should work closely with their eye care team to develop a personalized eye health plan that meets their specific needs and helps to manage the condition.

Other Diseases

Persistent Truncus ArteriosusPersistent Fetal CirculationPersistent Mullerian Duct SyndromePrimary HyperparathyroidismPrimary AldosteronismPrimary ErythromelalgiaPrimary HyperoxaluriaPrimary Hyperoxaluria Type 1Congenital Primary AphakiaPrimary Hyperoxaluria Type 3Primary Progressive AphasiaPrimary Lateral SclerosisPrimary Ovarian InsufficiencyPrimary Torsion DystoniaPrimary Cutaneous AmyloidosisPrimary Sclerosing CholangitisPrimary Carnitine DeficiencyPrimary Biliary CholangitisPrimary Progressive Nonfluent AphasiaPrimary Familial Brain Calcification